Black Night Falling – Rod Reynolds

Title – Black Night Falling

Author – Rod Reynolds

Published – August 2016

Genre – Crime fiction

This is a long outstanding review that I feel particularly guilty about not posting in a more timely manner but it’s also a post that I would swear I had written and was ready to press ‘publish’ on, but then was just a blank page…

Set a few months after the end of The Dark Inside, Charlie Yates is living in Venice Beach with Lizzie and they’re putting the past behind them. But a call from a friend suggesting that there was something unfinished about the events that took place in Texarkana draws him back to the South. He leaves Lizzie at home and arrives in Hot Springs only to find that the man whose call he was answering is dead.

Galvanised into action by this unexpected death he embarks on an investigation of his own, but unlike in the previous book he has no standing to do that so this is another obstacle he must overcome. As he starts to find out more about the events that prompted the original phone call there are threads that link back to Texarkana and he finds that his actions may have put Lizzie in peril.

Charlie is still wrestling with his demons and although he has mellowed a little after the events of the previous book, he is still quick to avoid being seen as a coward (which suggests that that’s really how he sees himself). He’s motivated by justice and revenge and is driven onwards by his conscience – he feels like the quintessential ‘good guy’ although he doesn’t always get it right.

This is incredibly atmospheric and if you didn’t know better you would imagine that the author had walked the Texarkana streets in the 1940s so what makes the writing even more astonishing is the fact that Rod Reynolds is a thirtysomething Londoner. There’s lots of historical detail and the voices of the characters really feel true to the period. There is a real feel of the ‘Wild West’ too with the dogged newspaper man facing up to the corruption he finds around him. The first book had its origin in historical events but this book proves that the author can devise his own plots without any help.

Another great read in the Charlie Yates series and if you’re after crime fiction / thriller with an unusual historical setting then this might be just what you’re looking for.

Many thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

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Watch Her Disappear – Eva Dolan

cover-jpg-rendition-460-707Title – Watch Her Disappear

Author – Eva Dolan

Published – 26 Jan 2017

Genre – Crime fiction

I’m trying to catch up with my blog and while a number of boxes of ‘to read’ books remain to be unpacked I do have a stack of ‘read but not yet reviewed’ books that it would be great to clear before the start of the new year. Let’s see how that goes!

First up is Watch Her Disappear which was an unusually early read for me and will be published towards the end of January 2017. This is the first of Eva Dolan’s books I’ve read and is the fourth in her ‘Zigic and Ferreira’ series based on the work of the Peterborough Hate Crimes Unit.

The book opens with a gripping action scene before switching to the two main detectives, DI Zigic and DS Ferreira, who are summoned to the scene of a murder. It’s obvious from the outset that the two detectives and their personal lives are important to the series and I can see that being a huge draw in making you want to read the next in the series, and the next… Fortunately, while they seem to have quite complicated personal lives it’s refreshing to read a police procedural where they aren’t afflicted by any of the more common cliches that appear (too) often in crime fiction.

I assume from the ‘hate crimes’ slant that the books have tackled some difficult subjects and certainly this book doesn’t shy away from one which is both difficult and topical. The victim of the attack was a trans woman and this opens up a whole host of issues, both for the investigation and through the complex personal life of the victim. The investigation uncovers a spate of attacks on trans women but there is also a serial rapist in the area which muddies the waters. The victim’s family had shown different levels of acceptance of her lifestyle and while the divisions felt as if they were portrayed accurately the attitudes of her friends and relations only serve to add another level of complexity to the police investigation.

As someone who hasn’t read the preceding books I didn’t feel that I was at any sort of disadvantage and there weren’t any moments where I thought that readers of the series would have more idea about what was going that I did. The plot featured a difficult subject that’s not often discussed and managed to be thought-provoking without seeming to preach, none of this affected the pace and the plot kept me guessing until the end.  The investigative aspect relied on interviews (rather than forensics) and the personal perspectives of the two lead detectives, who in themselves offered an unusual dynamic to a police procedural. All in all an excellent read.

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.

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Well here we are!

screen-shot-2016-12-15-at-20-53-29It wasn’t the smoothest move in the history of the world but I’m now living in my fourth ever county. While it’s not all gone to plan it’s a relief to have got the move done and have the chance to think about what’s next – THE MOVE has been such a big, looming event that it’s been impossible to see past it. Apparently it’s Christmas soon…

I was a reader before I was a blogger and have always had a lot of books; we’ve not unpacked any yet and there are close to 100 boxes still to go (hopefully not all books – there is an elusive cushion I’m still looking for). First we need to buy more shelves so a trip to Ikea is in order, but of course the days before Christmas aren’t the best time to pick. We’ve been here just a week and have managed to get a couple of rooms organised so we can escape from the heaps of boxes filling the other rooms. Small steps…

But at least we’ll have some time off in the next few weeks so we should have the opportunity to get more rooms sorted. And once there are some books unpacked then it’s back to the blog!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dead Line – Chris Ewan

716-ctbctqlTitle – Dead Line

Author – Chris Ewan

Published – 2013

Genre – Thriller

I enjoyed Safe House and it’s ridiculous that I let Dead Line languish on my TBR for so long, but I’m glad that I finally got round to reading it.

Dead Line is another gripping thriller with perhaps more of a mysterious feel to it compared to its predecessor. The main character is Daniel Trent, one half of a hostage negotiating duo, who live and works in France. He appears to be planning some sort of heist of his own when circumstances overtake him and his plans change.  The opening of the book is quite cryptic and Ewan drip feeds the reader information to flesh out the background to Trent’s story and the motivation for his attempt to turn from gamekeeper to poacher.

Cleverly written and fast-paced this was just the sort of thriller I enjoy and reminded me of Christmas mornings and not being able to resist racing through a new Dick Francis novel. There were some twists and revelations that I saw coming and others that I didn’t – a balance that means that this made a rewarding thriller that held my interest.

If I have a gripe it was the ending and I understand that I’m not the first person to have a grumble about it. But you’ll have to read the book yourself to see if you think my complaint is justified!

Everything a good thriller should be, I can highly recommend this. Thanks to the publisher for the review copy of this book.

1star1star1star1star

Looking forward to 2017

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Perhaps it’s the post-Iceland Noir blues but I’ve already started to think about the crime events to look forward to next year, so it seemed a good time to put my 2017 events listing together. Remember this isn’t all literary events (there are plenty of lists of those and there must be hundreds of events) but it is a list of the main dedicated crime fiction events taking place in the UK.

I aim to maintain the list and update it as dates are confirmed so do let me know if there’s anything I should add.

January

Nothing uncovered so far – perhaps we’re all busy reading!

February

24 – 26 February – Granite Noir – Aberdeen
This is a new crime writing festival featuring some of the most celebrated talent from the Nordic Noir scene alongside Scotland’s own Tartan Noir authors.

March

25 March – Deal Noir – Deal
An event over just one day, although quite an intimate event it’s punched above its weight with the calibre of authors participating in previous years. I’m looking forward to finding out who will be taking part in 2017.

31 March – 2nd April – Quais du Polar – Lyon
The theme for 2017 is due to be published shortly (December) – the festival is free, a short flight from the UK and much of the content accessible for English-speakers.

April

May

18-21st May – Crimefest – Bristol
A four-day convention drawing top crime novelists, readers, editors, publishers and reviewers from around the world.

June

17 June – Bodies from the Library – British Library, London
A one day conference with an exciting programme of discussions, presentations and panels on the Golden Age of Detective Fiction Writers.

30 June – 2 July – RebusFest – Edinburgh
A three-day even celebrating thirty years of John Rebus.  A festival of arts, literature, music and film curated by Ian Rankin – your chance to step into Rebus’ world and explore the making of the iconic detective you love. More info to be announced on 17 March.

July

20 – 23rd July – Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival – Harrogate, Yorkshire
Four days of Europe’s biggest come writing event, this year Peter James is the chair of the Programming Committee.

August

18 – 20th August – St Hilda’s Mystery and Crime Weekend – Oxford
This looks like it may be getting a bit of a re-vamp in 2017 – https://www.sthildas.ox.ac.uk/content/2017-st-hildas-mystery-and-crime-conference 

August – Margate Bookie, Margate
There is a dedicated series of crime fiction sessions in their Crimewave (ha!) part of the programme date TBC.

September

8 – 1oth September – Bloody Scotland – Stirling, Scotland
Scotland’s festival celebrating crime writing – bringing together leading Scottish and international writers, showcasing debut voices and encouraging new writers.

13 – 17th September – International Agatha Christie Festival – Torquay, Devon
Traditionally taking place in Torquay in the middle of September this festival features a range of events celebrating the life and work of Agatha Christie.

14 – 17th September – Noirwich Crime Writing Festival, Norwich, Norfolk

October

November

TBC – Hull Noir – Hull
An event filling the slot of the biennial Iceland Noir and part of the City of Culture celebrations.

December

All busy shopping for books …

Hidden Bodies – Caroline Kepnes

Title – Hidden Bodies51pgbojyk2l

Author – Caroline Kepnes

Published – 2016

Genre – Psychological thriller

This is the sequel to You by Caroline Kepnes – a book that I couldn’t stop raving about. I was thrilled to hear that we hadn’t seen the last of Joe and I was very much looking forward to Hidden Bodies.

So the question is – did it deliver? Sadly the answer is that I don’t think it did. In Hidden Bodies Joe has met a new woman and is putting the past behind him – except for one little issue that he left behind in a wardrobe. But when the tables are turned on him he heads for Los Angeles with plans to exact his revenge. Along the way he loses his purpose and becomes involved with a fantastically rich film-making pair of twins. Kepnes stretches the reader’s credulity with his exploits in the film world, nevertheless the bodies continue to pile up.

This lacked the intensity of its predecessor as well as much of the tension. I also didn’t find Joe’s behaviour consistent with the character I remembered from You. It’s obviously not inconceivable that his experiences have changed him but I don’t believe that’s the case, Joe was pretty entrenched in his views and behaviour. I also struggled with some of the cultural references, it was easier to follow the more literary ones in the first book than the ones in this sequel. Where the first book gave Joe’s quirky and skewed view of the world this felt more a piece about the excesses and superficial nature of the film industry and I’m not sure that New Yorker Joe was the right character to explore it. The pace also left a lot to be desired. Where You flew along this really seemed to drag and my attention wavered but perhaps this was a combination of the factors I’ve already mentioned…

This didn’t deliver the impact of Kepnes’ debut and wasn’t the twisted, stalker Joe that I wanted to read about.

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Keeping up

Moving house by Derek Mayes

Moving house by Derek Mayes

I’ve not been the most regular or reliable of bloggers. I always have a book on the go and if you check my Goodreads you’ll see that there often a few that I’m part way through but my reviewing can never keep up with the speed at which I read – even though I’m not a particularly prolific reader. There are currently around a dozen books that I’ve read but have yet to review – a situation that makes me feel perpetually guilty! So this post is to serve as a warning that if things go to plan this is a situation that is likely to get worse before it gets better.

With a bit of luck this won’t jinx things but we anticipate that before Christmas everything we own will be packed into a lorry and shipped to a whole new county (county not country – I’m not that brave!). It will be an exciting time and a big change for us but the list of things we need to do to make it happen seems never-ending and getting 12 book reviews posted to my blog is getting further and further down the list.

I’m currently trying to clear the backlog but while I will carry on reading and do intend to review the books I read it’s hard to say when a more ‘normal’ service might be resumed. Watch this space!