The Lantern Men – Elly Griffiths

Title – The Lantern Men

Author – Elly Griffiths

Published – 6 Feb 2020

Genre – Crime fiction / Mystery

The last book I read in the Ruth Galloway series was The Dark Angel and to me it felt like a departure within the series – lots of focus on Ruth’s personal life and less on the mystery element – however this 12th book feels like a return to form. In most cases with this series it hasn’t mattered that I’ve not read the books in order but I feel I’ve missed out on some significant changes which I assume too place in the preceding title (The Stone Circle) is I do need to get a copy of this.

A creepy (or charming, depending on your point of view) convicted murder, Ivor March, offers DCI Nelson the opportunity to find the bodies of two furthermurder victims, contingent on Ruth Galloway leading the dig. Somewhat flattered by the suggestion that she’s the best person for the job Ruth becomes involved in the investigation, despite her concerns that March has other reasons for requesting her.

The dig goes ahead and at the same time another woman dies in similar circumstances to March’s victims. Nelson, supported by colleagues Tanya and Judy, leads them to investigate a small group of people who all lived with March in a remote house called Grey Walls – somewhere Ruth is also connected to. As the story unfolds the investigation circles around this limited groups and the ins and outs of their tangled relationships. As with most (all?) of the series it also draws on local folklore with the real life mystery echoing tales of the ‘Lantern Men’.

The author makes the most of the atmospheric locations, setting the action across the historic centre of Cambridge, the expanse of the Fens and the rugged Norfolk coastline. The series is one where the characters are as important and the mystery; as the series progresses the minor characters offer more to each story and there is still the on/off nature of Ruth and Nelson’s relationship which still simmers in the background. An enjoyable read and return to focus on the mystery aspects of the plot.

Many thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

1star1star1star1star

One comment

  1. Glad you enjoyed this. To me, anyway, Griffiths’ work is so reliably good. Not that every book is perfect or completely, 100% to my taste, but as a series, it’s consistently well-written and engaging. Just my view…

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