Swan Song – Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott

Title – Swan Song

Author – Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott

Published – June 2018

Genre – Historical fiction

Although this is a bit of a change from my normal crime fiction reads I was intrigued by a book about Truman Capote, being the much revered author of ‘In Cold Blood’. I read In Cold Blood some time ago and also ‘Other Voices, Other Rooms’, both without knowing anything about Capote himself, but then caught the film ‘Capote’ on a flight. This filled me in on some of his, let’s say ‘quirks’ (and proved what a chameleon actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was), but didn’t particularly touch on the celebrity circles in which he moved. In a similar vein to ‘Mrs Hemingway’ this is a fictional account of real characters, and it is completely enthralling.

The timeline jumps about a bit (I was reading a netgalley which may have made it more difficult to know when I was) but the book opens in 1975, as the first chapter of Capote’s ‘Answered Prayers’ is published in Esquire magazine. After decades of sharing the most intimate secrets with his ‘Swans’ – a group of women from the highest ranks of American society – he publishes a thinly disguised story washing their dirty linen in the most public way. The Swans close ranks and Capote is shunned. While the story is the aftermath of the publication, the changes in timeline fill in some of the stories Capote has been told.

Truman Capote by Jack Mitchell

In the preceding years Capote has travelled the world with these woman and listened to their stories, in fact all of the women he surrounded himself with had stories to tell, often, like Capote himself, they were of their rise from rags to riches. But some, like Caroline Lee Radziwiłł (née Bouvier), Jaqueline Kennedy’s sister, were always high up the social ladder but still captivated him.

He’s also told a few stories of his own, and as with the arguments over how ‘nonfiction’ In Cold Blood truly was the book illustrates his manipulation of the truth (or ‘truth-flexing’) to suit his audience. Towards the end of the book we find out the truth behind the publication of the story that shattered his friendship with his greatest love. But this is Capote – who knows what to believe. Once we get to the final chapters and his increased reliance on drink and drugs the narrative becomes less coherent as Capote starts to see visions of the people he  wronged.

The narrative voice is unusually ‘we’ the voice of the swans together. They also refer to Capote as ‘the boy’ – which does tally with his often infantile behaviour. The writing style is unusual, it’s very easy to read with lots of showing rather than telling but I assume that some aspects are echoing the type of prose which might have been associated with Capote.

As with any fictionalised account I found myself a little frustrated not knowing where the line was between truth and fiction. I also found, as much was made of the Swans’ appearance, that I needed to google for photographs of them all. I even came across photographs of his infamous Black and White Ball before I reached it in the book, the ball in the book lived up to the expectations raised by the images. There are a few TV interviews which take place in the book that I would like to track down though…

This was a really fascinating book, I just have to remind myself that it’s a fictionalised story! Many thanks to the publisher for the NetGalley.

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