The Coffin Path – Katherine Clements

Title – The Coffin Path

Author – Katherine Clements

Published – 8 Feb 2018

Genre – Historical fiction

I might be posting this review WAY in advance of its publication date but this was such a perfectly timed read in the run up to Halloween. The Coffin Path is a gothic ghost story set in the seventeenth century at an isolated farm and manor house on the wild Yorkshire moors.

The book starts out from the perspective of Mercy Booth, a woman who challenges the expectations of the time about how a woman should behave. She sees herself as the mistress of Scarcross Hall (what a name!) and expects to inherit it when her father passes away. Scarcross is run down and the source of local rumour and superstition; the arrival of a mysterious stranger coincides with events that bring these to the fore. The man is Ellis Ferriby and as the narration switches between him and Mercy we see a different perspective on the period and gradually discover the secret that haunts him.

The controlled pace allows us to get to know and understand the characters as they face the sinister and mysterious events. Verging between the menace of a more corporeal threat versus an ethereal one, the tension is gradually ramped up through the book. As the incidents increase they take their toll on the inhabitants and the farm’s workers and gradually Mercy comes under more and more pressure and becomes more and more isolated.

The location could perhaps be credited as the third main character – the wilds of the moors, the remote location and the unforgiving weather all play their part. This isn’t a book that’s heavy on historical scene-setting – the period is obviously important for a number of reasons but it provides the backdrop to the story, rather than being the driver for it.

There was a point where I suspected that this might become something of a formulaic romance but while the relationship between the two main protagonists could take that direction the author kept the tone of the writing true to their personalities and anything that does (or doesn’t) happen avoids any predictable clichés. Both characters have their flaws but are immensely likeable and both are presented with situations which put them to the test.

The climax is thrilling and there was a sudden ‘aha’ moment which I hope I haven’t misinterpreted… A chilling and eerie story this is bound to make many lists as a ‘must read’ book for next Halloween.

Many thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

1star1star1star1star

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