Month: August 2017

In the Month of the Midnight Sun – Cecilia Ekbäck

Title – In the Month of the Midnight Sun

Author – Cecilia Ekbäck

Published – June 2016

Genre – Historical crime fiction

I was so taken with Wolf Winter that I treated myself to In the Month of the Midnight Sun when it came out in June last year (which shows you how far behind I am!).

Similar to some of the books by Anita Shreve, using the same location for a story in different times, Ekbäck returns to Blackåsen Mountain.  In this case we move from 1717 in Wolf Winter to 1856. On the mountain a Sami woman has left her tribe following the death of her husband, while the local settlers are puzzled by this but they have bigger worries as a Sami man has carried out a fatal attack in their rectory.

In Stockholm The State Minister of Justice instructs geologist Magnus to head to the area to investigate the attack. The Minster’s interest is purely bureaucratic, concerned that the sale of land in the area may be jeopardised. Magnus has some personal issues which he should deal with but perhaps prefers to avoid these by agreeing to the trip. The Minister is also Magnus’s adoptive father, so when at the last minute he is forced to have his sister-in-law, Lovisa, accompany him he is unable to argue against it. The two travellers set out for the long journey to Lulea with Lovisa withdrawn and uncommunicative and unprepared for what lies ahead.

The journey sees the relationship thaw a little and we find out more of the backstory of the two characters, and as the story switches between points of view (in the first person so you need to pay attention) we also learn more about those living in the shadow of the mountain. When eventually they reach Lulea and Magnus meets the man accused of the murders he doesn’t believe  he is the killer and knows that the only answer is to travel onwards to the Blackåsen Mountain.

Despite the broad, sweeping landscapes and the midnight sun this has a very claustrophobic feel and a very varied cast of characters with some unique voices. There is a hint of the supernatural in the lives of the Sami and the same battle with the elements that those in Wolf Winter faced. But essentially the story is about the people.

If you appreciate beautifully written, atmospheric crime fiction with a literary style then you really should try these books.

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The Templar’s Last Secret – Martin Walker

Title – The Templar’s Last Secret

Author – Martin Walker

Published – June 2017

Genre – Crime fiction

This is the tenth in the ‘Bruno, Chief of Police’ series of books and although I haven’t read all of the series it certainly seems to be the case that Walker isn’t losing his way as time moves on.

For me these books are a sort of ‘aspirational crime fiction’. Who wouldn’t want to be living in the countryside of the Périgord, riding horses, meeting up and cooking with friends – all accompanied by Balzac the basset hound. Despite the setting the situations do manage to echo the darkness of the ‘outside world’ which keeps the books topical but with the execution still keeping to the cosier side of crime fiction. All done without the getting the feeling that the circumstances are stretching credibility.

This latest title in the series is a great combination of the old and the new. The book opens with the discovery of the body of a woman outside a cave beneath the ruined Templar chateau of Commarque. The woman’s death re-opens debate over a centuries-old mystery concerning hidden treasure. This, as well as the forthcoming marriage of Bruno’s friends, two professional archaeologists, allows Walker to explore the history of the area and the Templars. (I have to confess that some of the background did feel a bit unnecessary.)

During the course of the investigation Bruno has a Ministry of Justice bureaucrat foisted on him who intends to carry out a time and motion study to better understand how he works with the locals and the gendarmes. The situation isn’t as bad as it may seem as Amélie has an exotic background, a dress style not often seen in the area and a singing voice that gains her more than a few admirers. Her character acts as a bit of a sidekick to Bruno and she becomes involved in his investigations, with the important task of demonstrating the power of social media.

Bruno’s investigations do, however, lead to a very modern problem. This involves a more traditional investigation which is eventually headed up by the mysterious Brigadier from Paris as well as a face from Bruno’s past.

Another enjoyable read in the series with the mix of domestic tranquility, police investigations, a race against time situation, historical background and very topical issues. And I can’t be the only person who has gone on to google the region to find out more about it after reading one of Walker’s books!

Many thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

The Black Friar – S. G. MacLean

Title – The Black Friar

Author – S. G. MacLean

Published – October 2016

Genre – Historical fiction

My intention is to crack on today and catch up on my reviews. Although I’ve been too busy to ‘blog’ I’ve been reading as much as ever so I have quite a stack of books to get through.

First up is The Black Friar, which came in the post from the publisher last year. This is the first book I’ve read in the series but the blurb tells me that this is the second in the Damian Seeker series and that the first book in the series (The Seeker) won the CWA Historical Dagger in 2015. In fact The Black Friar made it to this year’s Historical Dagger longest but sadly didn’t go through on the shortlist.

The book is set in London in 1655 – the time of Cromwell as Lord Protector. This is a time of unrest and there are many trying to challenge Cromwell; Seeker, as Captain of Cromwell’s Guard, has his hands full trying to stem this tide, so it’s surprising when he takes an interest in the body of a friar discovered in the walls of the Black Friar’s monastery. Behind the mystery of the dead friar, however, is a link to the spies in Cromwell’s service and as Seeker tries to find out more about the dead man he becomes involved in trying to find out why children have been disappearing. The story is told against the backdrop of the political machinations that are trying to uphold Cromwell’s authority against the undercurrent of dissent.

I really liked Seeker – he may be feared and have the power to make people cross the street, or even empty a coffee house, but he is still charming and has a sense of decency and justice that gives his character more depth. It was interesting to see the author drawing on real-life characters who walked the corridors of power (Samuel Pepys, Andrew Marvel) which did pique my interest in the period, probably more than just purely fictional characters would have done.

This was a gripping tale of espionage with a more conventional mystery to be solved too. There plotting was complex and pleasantly devious The historical detail felt well-researched and certainly provided an immersive experience of the period. The book definitely worked without having read the previous title but I shall make a point read more in the series.

Many thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

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